Revell 1999 (EM1) Honda Civic Si Coupe

Oh, the classic Civic. Cars like these with body graphics, ridiculous aero, underglow, and ostentatious wheels are what gave rise to the demeaning hatred of “riced” cars in the community.

I’m no Civic expert – having never owned one nor taken any in-depth interest in them – especially not the older generation cars like the EM1 (sixth gen) featured here. But I do recognize them as an iconic part of the car culture scene, which is why I decided to jump on another American kit; a departure from the usual JDM models. I didn’t have a bad experience with my latest Revell kit before this one, so I was willing to look past the wonky 1:25 scaling (most car models are 1:24) for a $15 model.

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HGCC Turn A Gundam

I’ll admit – I’ve never actually given Turn A a chance in terms of watching the entire series, if only because I simply haven’t gotten easy access to it. I know some peripheral information about its titular mobile suit just from picking up bits and pieces here in other Gundam shows and in the community, but I suppose I’ll never truly grasp the glory of the White Mustache in the time being. It seems Bandai hasn’t forgotten about the series though, as 14 years later we finally got a proper entry for the suit in the HGUC (or in this case HGCC) line.

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Tamiya Honda (Acura) NSX Type R

As much as everyone memes about Honda in the car community and rice this rice that, we seem to forget that they were behind one of Japan’s few machines that could be considered a supercar. The NSX feels extremely underrated, despite the numerous articles and news coverage pointing to this car taking the likes of Ferrari back to school on how to make a real quality performance machine.

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Tamiya Efini (Mazda) RX-7 + EightyOne Veilside Fortune Transkit

As the list of cars I love but will more than likely never own go, the RX-7 Fortune made famous by Tokyo Drift shares the pole position with the R34 Skyline. The body kit on this car is worth nearly as much as my entire current car, never mind including the price of the base RX-7 you’d be slapping the kit on, along with all the painting, body work to make the kit fit, wheels, coils, etc., and that’s without even touching the engine.

It’s an extravagant, expensive, and wildly unique body kit for one of Japan’s most iconic sports cars, so one has to wonder why so little merchandise is actually available – the only way to own a physical RX-7 Fortune was to sink the $70k into the real thing (barring the small undetailed diecast toy that Greenlight only come out with a month or two ago).  As such, I was beyond ecstatic when I found out that a Chinese company called EightyOne actually made a resin transkit for the Fortune.

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